S16: Large longitudinal studies from birth/early infancy to childhood/adolescence: Their importance and their contributions to children sleep knowledge

S16: Large longitudinal studies from birth/early infancy to childhood/adolescence: Their importance and their contributions to children sleep knowledge
Sunday, April 29 | 2:30pm-4:00pm | Room Bordeaux

Chair: Sabine Plancoulaine (France)

Early determinants of child sleep in ELFE study
Sabine Plancoulaine (France)

GUSTO study from early infancy to childhood: Longitudinal sleep trajectories and developmental outcomes
Shirong Cai (Singapore)

Sleep in Australian children: Learnings from 12 years of national data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
Jon Quach (Australia)


Summary of symposium:
« Large longitudinal studies from birth/early infancy to childhood/adolescence: their importance and their contributions to children sleep knowledge »
This symposium will present 4 birth or early infancy cohorts from different part of the world (Oceania, Asia, North America and Europe). Participants were recruited from the general population between 1997 for the oldest and 2011 for the most recent cohort. Children were followed up to nowadays. Presentations will focus on the contribution to children sleep knowledge on both determinants and health outcomes associated with sleep characteristics in early infancy, childhood and adolescence.
Sabine Plancoulaine will present the ELFE birth cohort (Etude Longitudinale Française depuis l’Enfance) that included 18329 children at birth in 2011. She will present the first results obtained on the early determinants of sleep characteristics at age 1 year.

Shirong Cai will present the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) study that recruited 1176 children at birth in 2009-2011. She will then focus on developmental outcomes. Jon Quach will present the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children that recruited 5000 0-1 year old and 5000 4-5 year old children in 2004-2005. He will then focus on the main results obtained within the cohort. Evelyne Touchette will present the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD) that recruited 2120 children at birth in 1997-1998. She will also present new insight about longitudinal childhood sleep characteristics associated with mental health problems in adolescence, specifically the longitudinal relations between both nocturnal awakening duration and sleep latency trajectories in childhood and externalizing problems and suicidal thoughts at age 15.

Learning Objectives:
Upon Completion of this CME activity, participants should be able to:
1 Apprehend and understand the interest of longitudinal prospective approaches
2 Apprehend the type of information collected and available in non-clinical samples (different from clinical samples)
3 Apprehend the need and utility of longitudinal prospective studies to suggest possible causal associations between events or factors and outcomes
4 Understand associations between early determinants of infant and childhood sleep characteristics
5 Understand associations between infant and childhood sleep characteristics and subsequent health outcomes, as development and mental health difficulties

Target Audience:
Pediatricians, clinical investigators, educators and public health specialists