S13: Cognitive, behavioral, and academic consequences of inadequate sleep in children

S13: Cognitive, behavioral, and academic consequences of inadequate sleep in children
Sunday, April 29 | 9:00am-10:30am | Room 342B

Chair: Mazza Stéphanie (France)

Associations between childhood sleep trajectories and academic performance
Evelyne Touchette (Canada)

Sleep and performance on an attention-demanding task
Karen Spruyt (France)

Cognitive dysfunction in children with narcolepsy
Stéphanie Mazza (France)

Sleep-dependent memory consolidation in young patients with attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
Alexander Prehn-Kristensen (Germany)

Sleep education at school
Amandine Rey (France)


Summary of symposium:
Sleep during childhood and adolescence is related to cognition, behavior, and daytime functioning. Children with sleep disorders frequently develop attention, learning, and memory difficulties. Sleep has also been related to cognitive functioning and academic performance in children who have neither clinically significant sleep disorders nor cognitive impairments.
This symposium will summarize the latest epidemiological and experimental data providing evidence for a deleterious impact of sleep disorders on the neurocognitive development. It will also present findings of ongoing studies suggesting that educational strategies have beneficial effects on sleep schedules and daytime performances. This symposium will gather 5 young researchers from Canada, France and Germany, working on developmental neuropsychology, cognition and psychoeducation.

Evelyne Touchette will review the current knowledge and present her recent data on the associations between childhood sleep trajectories and academic performance. In her presentation, Karen Spruyt will discuss the relationship between sleep and attentional performance in children aged 6 to 18 years old in their natural habitat. That is, she investigated the role of sleep in the allocation of attention resources with a computerized assessment, and explored the most important parameters in this relationship. Stéphanie Mazza will report recent findings on cognitive deficits in children suffering from narcolepsy, and will discuss the implication of sleep parameters in their daytime impairments. Alexander Prehn-Kristensen will present his recent findings regarding the role of sleep in long-term memory consolidation in young patients with attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent data regarding sleep intervention methods to ameliorate deficits in sleep-dependent memory consolidation in ADHD will also be presented.  Amandine Rey will report the preliminary findings of an ongoing educational sleep intervention study performed at school, and its beneficial consequences on sleep schedules and cognitive performances. This symposium will emphasize the importance of understanding sleep problems during childhood and their relationship to neurocognitive development.

Learning Objectives:
Upon Completion of this CME activity, participants should be able to:
1 Know the latest epidemiological and experimental data regarding sleep disorders and neurocognitive deficits
2 Understand the necessity of cognitive investigation in children with sleep disorders and academic difficulties
3 Understand the relationship between sleep and the allocation of attention resources and apprehend which sleep parameters (e.g., bedtime) are important for optimal performance throughout the day
4 Understand the necessity to investigate sleep in children with ADHD symptoms
5 Promote sleep education