A PRELIMINARY STUDY: A PRIORITY ORIENTED TAILORED SLEEP HYGIENE INTERVENTION REDUCED SLEEP DISTURBANCE AND ABSENTEEISM IN CORRESPONDENCE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Oral Session 1
Saturday, April 28, 2018 | 2:15pm-3:45pm | Room 342B

2:15pm-2:30pm
A PRELIMINARY STUDY: A PRIORITY ORIENTED TAILORED SLEEP HYGIENE INTERVENTION REDUCED SLEEP DISTURBANCE AND ABSENTEEISM IN CORRESPONDENCE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Authors:
Akiyoshi Shimura (Japan)*
Jun Ito (Japan)
Yoshikazu Takaesu (Japan)
Takashi Inoue (Japan)

Introduction

Sleep problems bring massive effect for adolescent health and school achievement. Absenteeism and presenteeism and subsequent dropout is a serious problem to schools, students, and public health. A cohort study suggested that sleep problems caused poor school achievement, academic failure, and dropout in school children.
In Japan, a government survey on this topic suggested that the major reason of dropout would be the existence of sleep and sleep-wake rhythm problems. Correspondence high school is the most common academic career after the dropout from ordinary high school. Therefore, there is a possibility that the students in corresponding high school have higher prevalence of sleep disturbance and sleep related absenteeism in school. We developed methods of sleep hygiene intervention and investigated whether the intervention to the correspondence high school students reduce the sleep disturbance and the absenteeism.

Materials and methods

From Jun. 2015 to Dec. 2015, sleep survey and subsequent intervention were performed in a brunch campus, where located in Tokyo, Japan with about 100 students, of a national-wide correspondence high school having approximately 6,000 students totally. Firstly, Sleep disturbance was assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire Survey Form (PSQI) for 82 students of the campus. Of total 82 students, 81 students gave informed consent and complete the questionnaire. PSQI indicated that 60 students had sleep disturbance (PSQI>5.5), of which 20 students applied and participated in the sleep hygiene intervention program. In the session of the intervention, each student was suggested which lifestyles to improve, depending on the type of the sleep problems he or she had. The lifestyles to be improved were weighted and prioritized based on our survey which was carried out in advance of the intervention and revealed the association between multiple lifestyle factors and sleep problems. The participant received a report described his or her sleep status and a statement of the action about the lifestyle which he or she decided to improve. After one or two weeks from the intervention, they were reminded of the session by the teachers. PSQI score and school attendance were measured after one or two months from the intervention.

Results

Among all cases, any lifestyle which increase the risk of sleep problems such as light exposure in the night especially in electric device use, frequent caffeine intake in the night, and lack of sunlight exposure in the morning was detected. Before the intervention, the sum of attendant days and absent days of the students were 321 days and 539 days. After the intervention, the figures improved to 221 days and 224 days. (χ2=17.88; p<0.01) As for sleep disturbance, PSQI score was significantly improved from 9.9±2.9 to 6.9±3.3 (Paired T-Test: p<0.01).

Conclusions

We employed a sleep hygiene intervention, which prioritized and was tailored for each student. Our analysis demonstrated that the method might reduce sleep disturbance and absenteeism among correspondence course high school students. This study is merely a pilot study, and now sufficiently large sample and multi-center study are performing.

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP17K10343.